Close

September 16, 1991

Poor and Wise or Rich and Foolish?

Share With Friends

Better a poor but wise youth than an old but foolish king who no longer knows how to take warning. ECCLESIASTES 4:13
There is almost nothing more discouraging than working around people who don’t listen, who are stubborn even when confronted with data, and who are generally unteachable. They already know all the answers. Their minds are made up. Good argument to the contrary means nothing. Even their polite nods mask a steel resolve to go their own direction.
About people like that, Solomon weighs in with strong opinion: “Better a poor but wise youth than an old but foolish king who no longer knows how to take warning” (Ecclesiastes 4:13).
No matter where these unteachable individuals reside in the corporate hierarchy, they are obstacles to be reckoned with. Anyone could fall into this category— the big boss, the building engineer, the head of the mail room, or the travel agent. But at all costs, don’t let it be you.
How do you take suggestions? What do you do with evaluation and feedback? Where is your response on the defensiveness meter? When was the last time you thanked someone for giving you negative feedback? When someone comes to you with an opinion different from your own, how would they describe your response? Would they use the words love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, or self-control (Galatians 5:22-23)? As Solomon reminds us, it is better to end up poor and wise than rich and foolish.
What is worse than being wrong? Being wrong and not knowing or admitting it.

Share With Friends