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January 8, 1994

Queen of Organization

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She gets up while it is still dark; she provides food for her family and portions for her servant girls. … She watches over the affairs of her household and does not eat the bread of idleness. PROVERBS 31:15, 27
When you read about the woman in Proverbs 31, the one often described as the “wife of noble character” or the “virtuous woman,” you get the distinct impression that she was the epitome of the word organized.
There is absolutely no way in the world that she could have taken care of everything in her life—her husband, her business, her investments, her employees, her children, her philanthropic interests, her health, and her community responsibilities—if she did not possess the ability to juggle numerous balls in a highly efficient manner.
We may not have as many responsibilities as she did, and it may not even be realistic to expect us to handle the ones we do have with such grace. We can, however, learn a couple of very valuable lessons from these verses that will help us juggle all the balls in our lives a little better.
First, she did not waste time. She got up early, stayed up late, and she didn’t participate in any nonproductive, brainless activities. This was not a woman who spent several hours—or even one hour—a day watching soap operas. She didn’t flip on the TV at night and spend the evening watching mindless sitcoms with her children.
Second, she anticipated the needs of the people in her life. As a result, she didn’t have to spend her days rushing around, frantically trying to get things done at the last minute. She watched over the affairs of her household closely enough to know when supplies were running low and when tensions were beginning to escalate, and she was able to take steps to fix problems before they escalated into full-blown crises.
You may not have the organizational gifts that the Proverbs 31 woman had. But you will be much more effective—both at home and at work—if you intentionally stopped engaging in nonproductive activities and started anticipating the needs of the people around you a little better. Try it—the results might surprise you!

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