Close

July 15, 1995

The Wise and Otherwise (Part Two)

Share With Friends

Who is wise and understanding among you? JAMES 3:13
Wisdom is a rich biblical word. One of its earliest references in Scripture is built around the personality and life of Solomon. We usually remember Solomon as the man with a thousand wives. But he also was an author, diplomat, engineer, financier, king, philanthropist, philosopher, poet, theologian, and writer of songs (and those are just a few highlights from his résumé).
Second Chronicles tells us that Solomon had one of the most unique opportunities that any human could ever have. God allowed him to ask for anything he wanted—and committed to providing it. And what did Solomon do? He asked for wisdom and knowledge so he could lead the people of Israel (2 Chronicles 1:10).
The wisdom Solomon asked for wasn’t theoretical. It wasn’t simply textbook knowledge, intellectual horsepower, or even a high IQ. It wasn’t persuasion, logic, or rhetoric. What Solomon needed was practical insight into his life and into the lives of people who were within his circle and sphere of responsibility. We’re not talking about a small team here. It is estimated that Solomon managed 160,000 people when he was overseeing the construction of the great Temple at Mount Moriah.
Solomon wanted to lead this large group of people effectively, so he asked God for wisdom. Why? He understood that true wisdom is a gift we receive from the Lord, not a capability we develop.
We all should follow Solomon’s example in praying for the gift of wisdom. Parents should pray that their kids become wise. Employers should pray that they will be wise and that their employees will receive wisdom.
We may not have to manage 160,000 people every day, but, like Solomon, we do have people continually around us who require our leadership. Consequently, we also have a great need for wisdom. Here’s an assignment. Get out a piece of paper and write the words spouse, parents, kids, boss, coworkers, and friends down the left side of the page. On the right side, write, What must I do to demonstrate wisdom? Then, prayerfully fill it out.

Share With Friends